The dirty little secret of self-censorship...

Feb 13, 2009 by

Interesting article in the February School Library Journal on how school and children’s librarians self-censor themselves when it comes to buy potentially controversial titles for their collection. Working in a public university, I don’t have such qualms although I sometimes do wonder if some titles will elicit a reaction (so far, none). I’m more concerned about the fit with our disciplines and research interests. I try to make sure I represent various point of views (still looking for solid titles on intelligent design though. Any suggestions?). I have the limitation of being careful not to duplicate titles found elswhere in my library system even though they could answer a need locally (it’s fair enough although sometimes it disappoint patrons – they don’t want to wait for the intralibrary loan to come in.) But I...

read more

ARL Digital Repositories Task Force releases its final report...

Feb 11, 2009 by

The Association of Research Libraries’ Digital Repositories Task Force released its final report earlier this year. The Research Library’s Role in Digital Repository Services is freely accessible on the ARL website. It does not concentrate on content or technology but simply on the services in general. Important actions that research libraries should undertake include the following: • Build a range of new kinds of partnerships and alliances, both within institutions and between institutions. • Base service-development strategies on substantive assessment of local needs rather than blindly replicating work done at another institution. • Engage with key local policy issues and stakeholders to encourage institutional engagement with national and international policy issues. • Develop outreach and marketing strategies that assist “early adopters” of repositories to connect with the developing repository-related service system. • Define a...

read more

Revolution of the e-books

Feb 9, 2009 by

Mike Elgan of ComputerWorld lists six reasons e-books are about to reach an unprecedented high. the economy the environment (or green living) a publishing revolution (or self-publishing) the rise in aggressive e-book marketing a rise in books written for electronic reading and the decline of the newspaper industry Elgan also mentions the Kindle/iPhone effect, where, finally, some readers are really catching...

read more

Sources for sci-tech book reviews...

Jan 12, 2009 by

Recently on the STS-L list, someone asked for good sources for book reviews in science and technology. As one of the reasons I started EngLib all that time ago was to create my own archive of interesting-things-to-know-and-remember, I will list the suggested items here by the various contributors to the thread (thanks to them). Choice Science Nature American Scientist BioScience The Scientist New Scientist Environment  Science & Technology Libraries Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship  the newsletter of the SLA scientific and engineering divisions, SciTech News  R.R. Bowker’s Resources for College Libraries online Physics Today Physics Teacher Angewandte Chemie International Edition  various MAA journals (for mathematics)  Science Books and Films are said to be OK, but may be more oriented toward public libraries than academic institutions E-Streams: Electronic Reviews of Science & Technology...

read more

Chemical Information Sources wiki...

Sep 8, 2006 by

Gary Wiggins, of the Indiana University’s School of Informatics, has created a wiki containing his old C471 Chemical Information Sources and Services course notes. So far, two chapters are accessible: Searching for the Synthesis or Reactions of Specific Compounds or Classes of Compounds Chemical Safety and Toxicology Information He graciously invites the community of people who are engaged in teaching about chemical information sources will collectively engage in modifying, updating, and enhancing this resource. He expects to be more content from his class on the wiki this...

read more

Eprintweb.org

Sep 8, 2006 by

IOP has launched a free e-print service in cooperation with arXiv.org advisory committee and Cornell University Library, Eprintweb.org. Eprintweb.org uses content from arXiv, but proposes a different search interface. Reference linking is also available. The content is updated daily. Creation of a personal account permits personalization options like email alerts and flagging of individual articles. For more info, contact John Haynes, Assistant Director, IOP...

read more